Tag Archives: protest

Live tweeting from the TUC march

29 Mar

I caught up with budding journalist Joe Dyke, who was live tweeting from Central London covering the TUC’s March for the Alternative, as well as the improvised protests staged by UK Uncut.

How was your smart phone helpful on the day?

“I obviously had it to live tweet, but I had Twitter up all the time and was following all the main figures in the movement, such as

The Fortnum and Mason protest at which Joe was present

people from UK Uncut. There were about 5 or 6  of them posting all the time so I could see where they were going. I also knew some contacts so was able to mix it up with ringing them to stay on top of it.”

Any examples of how you used your smart phone?

“I heard about Fortnum on Mason on my phone and I was somewhere north of Regent Street at the time. I was able to use the map function on my phone to work out a quick way of getting there without having to go through the crowds, which cut about 20 minutes off the journey. I ended up getting there about two minutes after the invasion so was able to see some of the really interesting stuff, such as the police getting attacked with paint. I then tweeted about this.” Continue reading

The twitter revolution

12 Feb

The protests in Iran, which sparked the debate. Photo: 27389271 Flickr.

With a wave of demonstrations across the Middle East and North Africa, a new book, arguing that the internet does more harm than good politically, is being put to the test.

Sparked by the use of twitter during the Iranian 2009 protests, the debate on whether mobile phones and the internet are the tools of the 21st century revolution is ongoing.  

The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom, by Evgeny Morozov, challenges popular opinion, arguing that rather than liberating the world, web-based activism helps repressive regimes maintain their position of power.

Continue reading

No quiet riot as mobiles help showcase protest to the world

12 Nov

Yesterday’s student demonstration in London made clear precisely how pivotal mobile technology now is for modern journalism.

In days gone by we would have heard real-time information about the protest and the ensuing rioting via the radio. Whatever the presenter told us was exactly what we would have believed. For a visual handle you’d have to wait until the evening news, whereby you’d see some footage and hear a reporter explaining the event based either on what they had witnessed, or the sources they chose to speak to. Essentially the coverage of an event involving hoards of people over a vast space would have been conveyed via very limited pairs of eyes and ears.

Images were uploaded onto Flickr by mobile journalists such as Sarah Noorbakhsh

Nowadays this form of reporting has taken a kick to the teeth. We, as the absorbing public, demand speed, efficiency, accuracy and engagement as prerequisites. Yesterday we were able to watch a new breed of reporting in perfect motion, as eyewitnesses posted minute-by-minute information on Twitter, and photographers uploaded via Flickr. Sky News’ Kay Burley, who made several slapdash reporting bloopers, could have learned a thing or two from the would-be journalists on the streets. Continue reading