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Should we allow court proceedings to be tweeted?

30 Mar

Twitter free courtrooms may be locked in the past. Photo: Most Uncool.

The Lord Chief Justice is backing the use of twitter in court in the hope that it will spark a revival in court reporting.

“My fervent hope is that the advance of new technology will make it easier for the media to be ‘present’ in court, and that the present trend for fewer and fewer reporters in every court will come to an end,” Lord Judge said in a speech on the judiciary and the media.

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Get videos analysing global news straight to your mobile

30 Mar
 

CNN will be shown next to Al Jazeera coverage. Photo: Lubrio.

With the boom of the web, people are demanding fast, convenient news that can be quickly consumed. Critics of the internet often argue that the context of stories is being lost, and that even though we are living in an increasingly connected world, knowledge of events outside our immediate sphere remains limited.

There may be multiple sources of news to choose from, but we are still often sticking to what we know best.   

Newsy is a mobile video site that is tacking this. Using short video segments, it helps people understand the differences in how news organisations from across the globe are reporting a story. For example, coverage from CNN will put right next to Al Jazeera.      

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Live tweeting from the TUC march

29 Mar

I caught up with budding journalist Joe Dyke, who was live tweeting from Central London covering the TUC’s March for the Alternative, as well as the improvised protests staged by UK Uncut.

How was your smart phone helpful on the day?

“I obviously had it to live tweet, but I had Twitter up all the time and was following all the main figures in the movement, such as

The Fortnum and Mason protest at which Joe was present

people from UK Uncut. There were about 5 or 6  of them posting all the time so I could see where they were going. I also knew some contacts so was able to mix it up with ringing them to stay on top of it.”

Any examples of how you used your smart phone?

“I heard about Fortnum on Mason on my phone and I was somewhere north of Regent Street at the time. I was able to use the map function on my phone to work out a quick way of getting there without having to go through the crowds, which cut about 20 minutes off the journey. I ended up getting there about two minutes after the invasion so was able to see some of the really interesting stuff, such as the police getting attacked with paint. I then tweeted about this.” Continue reading

Weather updates are the top search on mobiles

26 Mar

Weather updates beat news in mobile searches. Photo: Svedek.

Weather updates and local business searches are the most popular reason for people tapping into their mobile according to research.

The Project for Excellence in Journalism  found that local news coverage followed next, trailed by sports and traffic information.

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Guardian appoint first mobile editor

22 Mar

The Guardian has announced the appointment of their first dedicated mobile editor, spelling out the significance of mobile journalism for the future of the industry.

Subhajit Banerjee, the Guardian's first mobile editor

The role has been awarded to Subhajit Banerjee, who moved to the paper from the the Daily Telegraph, where he blogged about technology and overseen the launch of their ipad app.

Speaking to Journalism.co.uk yesterday, Janine Gibson the Guardian online editor, said that as well as fine tailoring their mobile output, Banarjee would also be “championing mobile practises”. This revelation should excite mobile journalism junkies. The Guardian has already been one of the forerunners in mobile journalism, consistantly running live blogs and live tweet streams. If Banerjee is to further develop these practises, exciting times lay ahead.

The Times also has a dedicated mobile editor, having been appointed in Brigid Callaghan to the role in 2008.

 

Photo: Journalism.co.uk

Mobile journalism conference

20 Mar

An upcoming international conference will explore how emerging digital and social technologies will impact journalism, media communications and publishing.

For two days, professors, journalists, bloggers, and entrepreneurs will debate how social technologies can be used to improve the journalism we produce. Speakers include press critic Jay Rosen, and Riyaad Minty, head of social media at Al Jazeera.  

Held by Media140 Frontiers, the event in Barcelona takes place 13 – 14 April. Tickets cost €120 and are still available.

Click here for conference details.

Twestival 2011

20 Mar

Photo courtesy of Twestival 2011

On Thursday 24 March, local Twestivals (Twitter Festivals) will be held in numerous cities across the globe. From small meetings in pubs and restaurants to large scale sposnored events, the local Twestivals provide mobile journalists and social media lovers with a chance to come together and interact offline, while raising money for charity.

The events, which are run entirely by volunteers, are aimed at bringing together social media gurus at an offline event that focuses on grassroots funding for a particular cause. Since 2009, Twestival has raised nearly $1.2million for over 130 different causes, demonstrating clearly the power of internet-based media.

While Twestival, which originated in London in 2009, is primarily a social media event,  it will provide mobile journalists with an opportunity to connect with other like-minded people, learn more about social media and its uses in journalism and make incredibly valuable journalistic contacts.

For more information about this year’s Twestival and for details about how to purchase tickets go to www.twestival.com